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Flying without an engine
The Soaring Society of America, Inc. was formed in 1932 to foster and promote all phases of soaring, both nationally and internationally. Since then, the SSA membership has grown to in excess of 12,000.
Today the SSA strives to provide support to the sport of soaring and to actively promote involvement of the youth in this form of aviation.
The sport is called "soaring" and to pilot as well as spectator, it has universal appeal.
Soaring offers a sense of freedom unique in sports. As a soaring pilot you are no longer earthbound; as your pilot skills increase, you will learn to venture away from the airport in a sailplane, relying on your own skills and judgment in analyzing the terrain and weather. Instead of passively enjoying the countryside or the sky, you will actively look for lift clues in the air, such as birds and the maturity of cumulus clouds; and you'll gain respect for areas on the ground that can help or hinder you in meeting the continuing challenge of staying aloft.

The intellectual challenge of soaring is its main appeal to many glider pilots. Gravity tells you that you and your machine, which together may weigh 500 to 2000 pounds, have no business staying aloft and that your place is on the ground since you have no engine to stay airborne. You know that the sun and the wind are providing an invisible force frequently far stronger than the force of gravity, but it's up to you to make the most of that force through your interpretation of it and of your own pilot skills. The best combination brings the longest flight, the highest altitude gain, or the fastest speed in a contest.
Stop by our booth (N56-N67) in the North Exhibit area to learn more about soaring and where you can fly sailplanes close to your home. [ home ]
More: ssa.org

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